This blog is for anything I find interesting. I have many interests: chemistry, math, philosophy, poetry, libertarianism, etc. I have some hero's who I hope to find on tumblr more often who include: Buckminster Fuller, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Carl Jung, Marshall Mcluhan, Kurt Godel, John Muir and more. Any questions about anything, just ask.
The link below is to my other blog, it's less serious, and is for posting things that wouldn't fit on this one. It's more of an indulgence blog, so check it out.
http://weltanshauung.tumblr.com/

prostheticknowledge:

I PIXEL U

iOS7 photo app can pixelate subjects in photos, which gives the look of 8bit digital subjects in the real world.

It is a simple, so easy app!!! “Pixel in real world”

After opening the app, you simply choose between take a photo or pick a photo from gallery. After recognize the face automatically from photos, It shows up with the guidelines.

Features:

- Auto face detection from photos.
- Auto adjustment by types of your picture. No settings!
- Use real world backgrounds with pixelated person.
- Edit Mask to change the area you want to pixelate.
- 
Share your amazing PIXEL ARTS with all your friends.

More can be found at the J2WORK website here or the App Store here

hamsterloki:
knottybear:
archiemcphee:
Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:
[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 
So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

hamsterloki:

knottybear:

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

prostheticknowledge:

The Open Hand Project

A 3D printed robotic prosthetic hand which is a fraction of the cost compared to current available models - video embedded below:

The Open Hand Project aims to make advanced prosthetic hands more accessible to amputees. The Dextrus hand is the realization of this goal, it’s a low-cost robotic hand that offers much of the functionality of a human hand. Ultimately, these hands will be sold for under $1000 (£630).

The Open Hand Project is open-source, which means all of the plans to make a robotic hand will be published online with no patents, anyone has the right to make their own and even sell it themselves. You’re funding the full development of the hand with the Open Hand Project, after that companies will be able to use the designs and sell the hands all over the world. This really helps get these devices out to developing countries and places where import taxes might otherwise increase the cost of distribution.

The project is looking for funding through an indiegogo campaign - more info can be found here

odditiesoflife:

Stunning Time Capsule House Opened After 100 Years

An eccentric wealthy civil servant, Louis Mantin, wrote a will stating that his house was to be closed then reopened to the public a hundred years after his death, shedding light on how people lived back in the 19th century. This peek into life a century ago shows a world of opulence and change. Electricity and hot running water were new phenomena in houses, as were indoor toilets. The living areas were made for women who wore long skirts and sat sewing or at other gentle pursuits while men’s spaces were big and dark and bold.
Louis Mantin’s bedroom is a jewel of opulence with its carved four poster bed, but most extreme are the walls covered in gilded leather. This material was made in 1812 and covered in silver leaf, then varnished in yellow to give it a golden look.
The bed in the Ladies Salon was hung with curtains in the same pink material the walls are covered in. Called “Four Seasons”, Allaire’s room was extremely feminine, with painted ornamentation above every door showing seasonal scenes.
Wanting the best of everything, Mantin’s was the first house in Moulins to have electricity, and one of the only ones to have hot and cold running water as well as toilets on each floor.

The electric lamp shown here came from the catholic church. The assistant curator says: “Mantin wanted to have comfort—he was very interested in modernization.”

Mantin was interested in all sorts of eclectic things, and in his house you could find not only the stuffed wolf but also a diorama of real dead frogs fighting a duel in a glass globe. There is also a rat playing a violin and a stuffed blowfish.
The toilet is porcelain covered with wood, and the bath of course is a modern (for the time) version of the hip bath. The screen in front of the fire was intended to prevent drafts when people were soaking in the warm tub.
The formal living room is opulent in the extreme! It contains marble-topped tables, a chandelier, embroidered chairs, and rather than the usual mirror above the fire place, there is a window into the next room
Although the house is stunning, Mantin only partially set out what he intended to show. He did indeed conceal his home for 100 years to reveal the dramatic differences between houses of today and his house from a century ago. However since Mantin was rich and owned a mansion, he is only showing how rich people lived in opulence 100 years ago. This is certainly not how most people lived then.
astrodidact:
A team at the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics is developing an experiment intended to test a seemingly insane idea that the third dimension doesn’t actually exist but is in fact a hologram created by the intertwining of time and depth at the Planck length.
This idea while seemingly insane is supported by the math, but to date there is no physical evidence to confirm it. That in itself is not surprising because we don’t have the tools to observe it. Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab says “You can’t perceive it because nothing ever travels faster than light, this holographic view is how the universe would look if you sat on a photon.”
Enter the Holographic Interferometer or Holometer. The Holometer is a machine designed to test this very idea. It works by setting up two distinct but cooperative Interferometers. A Holometer works by sending a beam of light down a vacuum where it hits a beam splitter that, you guessed it, splits the beam in two. The two beams then travel in separate directions before hitting a mirror and being bounced back.
Since the beams of light travel at a constant speed, when they come back together they should be in sync. Any tiny vibration would change the frequency of the waves causing them to be out of sync when they meet back at the origin point.
If this happens it would indicate a fuzziness of space-time similar to the fuzziness of an image when you zoom in too far, essentially a pixelation of reality. Sensors on the outside of the instrument will detect any vibrations and cancel them out ensuring that any discrepancies are in fact due to pixelation or fuzziness of space-time.
If successful this will be the first physical evidence and measure of the Planck length and would support Hogan’s notion of the holographic nature of the universe.
Fermilab is planning to begin gathering data next year.
http://sciencethat.com/?p=182

astrodidact:

A team at the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics is developing an experiment intended to test a seemingly insane idea that the third dimension doesn’t actually exist but is in fact a hologram created by the intertwining of time and depth at the Planck length.

This idea while seemingly insane is supported by the math, but to date there is no physical evidence to confirm it. That in itself is not surprising because we don’t have the tools to observe it. Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab says “You can’t perceive it because nothing ever travels faster than light, this holographic view is how the universe would look if you sat on a photon.”

Enter the Holographic Interferometer or Holometer. The Holometer is a machine designed to test this very idea. It works by setting up two distinct but cooperative Interferometers. A Holometer works by sending a beam of light down a vacuum where it hits a beam splitter that, you guessed it, splits the beam in two. The two beams then travel in separate directions before hitting a mirror and being bounced back.

Since the beams of light travel at a constant speed, when they come back together they should be in sync. Any tiny vibration would change the frequency of the waves causing them to be out of sync when they meet back at the origin point.

If this happens it would indicate a fuzziness of space-time similar to the fuzziness of an image when you zoom in too far, essentially a pixelation of reality. Sensors on the outside of the instrument will detect any vibrations and cancel them out ensuring that any discrepancies are in fact due to pixelation or fuzziness of space-time.

If successful this will be the first physical evidence and measure of the Planck length and would support Hogan’s notion of the holographic nature of the universe.

Fermilab is planning to begin gathering data next year.

http://sciencethat.com/?p=182

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Listen to Bitcoin Transactions in Real-time

Realtime Bitcoin transaction visualizer. See and hear new transactions, trades and blocks as they propagate.

Listen to Bitcoin is a realtime trade visualizer by Maximilian Laumeister, turning each transaction into a bubble and audible tone. 

Seasteading Institute Goal

The Seasteading Institute wishes to enable the creation of ocean city-states in order to advance humanity through innovative startup governments. We believe that competition in government will lead to better government for the whole planet. Governments are ultimately the stewards of institutions, which are more or less the “rules of the game.” Looking around the world, it is easy to see that some countries have better rules than others. Good or bad, however, rules can become entrenched in the absence of competition from new market entrants. Currently no new governments can peacefully enter the “governance market,” but with seasteading, experimentation with new rules is possible.

http://www.seasteading.org/

sexhaver:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

breathe into the BEE ORB to reveal your fate

Georg Ferdinand Ludwig Philipp Cantor was a German mathematician, best known as the inventor of set theory, which has become a fundamental theory in mathematics. Cantor established the importance of one-to-one correspondence between the members of two sets, defined infinite and well-ordered sets, and proved that the real numbers are “more numerous” than the natural numbers. In fact, Cantor’s method of proof of this theorem implies the existence of an “infinity of infinities”. He defined the cardinal and ordinal numbers and their arithmetic. Cantor’s work is of great philosophical interest, a fact of which he was well aware
image from:
http://www.mathematicianspictures.com/Mathematicians/Cantor.htm
They have a lot of cool Math pics.

Georg Ferdinand Ludwig Philipp Cantor was a German mathematician, best known as the inventor of set theory, which has become a fundamental theory in mathematics. Cantor established the importance of one-to-one correspondence between the members of two sets, defined infinite and well-ordered sets, and proved that the real numbers are “more numerous” than the natural numbers. In fact, Cantor’s method of proof of this theorem implies the existence of an “infinity of infinities”. He defined the cardinal and ordinal numbers and their arithmetic. Cantor’s work is of great philosophical interest, a fact of which he was well aware

image from:

http://www.mathematicianspictures.com/Mathematicians/Cantor.htm

They have a lot of cool Math pics.

You’ve probably heard of safety testing for food products or agriculture, but how about marijuana? Not far from Silicon Valley, a new cottage industry is forming to make cannabis safer for people with weak immune systems through forensic testing.

"It’s very important because every other industry has some component of quality control testing, has regulations, has standards," says lab director Josh Wurzer of SC Labs in Capitola, California. "I think a lot of people are getting to the point where they’re saying, ‘Give us some sort of guidance.’"

An important fact about SC Labs customers is that they step up to have their products tested without any government agencies forcing them to do so. Why? Promising customers safety may make good business sense.

"We have several hundred clients across the state and these are dispensary owners or growers who do it voluntarily. And it’s amazing to see the people who are voluntarily coming to us, paying a lot of money to have us test their medicine, some of which doesn’t pass, just to ensure that the patients that they serve are as safe as possible," says Wurzer.

Monday, December 9, 2013

prostheticknowledge:

Tangible Augmented Reality Action Figure

Articulate figurine frame featuring many AR code points can alter poses of virtual models, put together by Alcyone - video link below (in Japanese):

Link

thebrainscoop:

More images of bones that were 3D printed from a CT scanned cheetah (photos of that process here).

Anthropologist and conservationist JP Brown modeled and rendered this skeletal for an upcoming exhibition about biomechanics, opening in March. This will be incorporated with an exterior model, the end result revealing a partial skeleton. Museums utilizing new technology in this way means we can share our research outside of our walls without having to worry about obtaining permits for protected species remains, or risk damaging permanent collections items. 

And, you know, it’s a printed cheetah.

reckon:
William S. Burroughs: The Book of Breeething (1974/1975)
A short essay on Egyptian hieroglyphics, Hassan i Sabbah, The Curse of King Tut and state-coups.
With illustrations by Robert F. Gale.
First published as The Book of Breething, OU Henri Chopin, Ingatestone, Essex, UK, 1974 (in 50 copies)
Publisher Blue Wind Press, Berkeley, 1975 (in 250 copies) An Overdrive Book ISBN 0912652276 76 pages
Download (PDF 96 MB)Download (Alt link)
Via monoskop.org

reckon:

William S. Burroughs: The Book of Breeething (1974/1975)

A short essay on Egyptian hieroglyphics, Hassan i Sabbah, The Curse of King Tut and state-coups.

With illustrations by Robert F. Gale.

First published as The Book of Breething, OU Henri Chopin, Ingatestone, Essex, UK, 1974 (in 50 copies)

Publisher Blue Wind Press, Berkeley, 1975 (in 250 copies)
An Overdrive Book
ISBN 0912652276
76 pages

Download (PDF 96 MB)
Download (Alt link)

Via monoskop.org

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Major biological discovery...inside the Chernobyl reactor??

wizzlbang:

wizzlbang:

The abandoned town of Pripyat, the Chernobyl reactor in the background. There has been an exciting new biological discovery inside the tomb of the Chernobyl reactor. Like out of some B-grade sci fi…

First the Bacteria feeding on our plastic pollution, now this.
Nature is adapting to our presence on this planet, at this rate things that prey exclusively on us might start popping up…

No guys, you don’t understand
They found a collection of fungi thriving inside the Chernobyl plant which uses radiation as a food sorce, using melanin the same way plants use chlorophyl

That is the tightest fucking shit

 
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