This blog is for anything I find interesting. I have many interests: chemistry, math, philosophy, poetry, libertarianism, etc. I have some hero's who I hope to find on tumblr more often who include: Buckminster Fuller, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Carl Jung, Marshall Mcluhan, Kurt Godel, John Muir and more. Any questions about anything, just ask.
The link below is to my other blog, it's less serious, and is for posting things that wouldn't fit on this one. It's more of an indulgence blog, so check it out.
http://weltanshauung.tumblr.com/

A Short History of Long-Term Thinking, for Our Fifty Thousand Year Time Capsule

In the year 2014, a space capsule named KEO will be launched into orbit with support from UNESCO and the European Space Agency. Its destination is the planet Earth, 50,000 years from now.

Every person on the planet can put their own message in the capsule, follow the link below.

http://www.keo.org/uk/pages/message.php

Why Bitcoin Terrifies Big Banks - Interview with Andreas Antonopoulos

Abby Martin speaks with Andreas Antonopoulos, founder of Root Eleven and co-host of let’s Talk Bitcoin, discussing how Bitcoin works, and why it’s so important to have a decentralized system of money.

Friday, January 24, 2014

Quants: The Alchemists of Wall Street

Quants are the math wizards and computer programmers in the engine room of our global financial system who designed the financial products that almost crashed Wall st. The credit crunch has shown how the global financial system has become increasingly dependent on mathematical models trying to quantify human (economic) behaviour. Now the quants are at the heart of yet another technological revolution in finance: trading at the speed of light. 

What are the risks of treating the economy and its markets as a complex machine? Will we be able to keep control of this model-based financial system, or have we created a monster?

A story about greed, fear and randomness from the insides of Wall Street.

Director: Marije Meerman
Research: Gerko Wessel

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

yearoftheglitch:

Infected Blankets @ GlitchTextiles.com

The complete genome of the H1N1 influenza strain, translated into a colorful woven mosaic, where each pixel represents the coding for a single amino acid.

Translation
Nucleotides are assigned binary values:
A=00
C=01
G=10
T=11

Every three nucleotides is assigned to a pixel (2-bits per RGB channel).

Sunday, December 15, 2013

prostheticknowledge:

Renaissance Full HD

3D animation piece from Unicorn imagines a modern-day Renaissance museum in the internet-era, using models of people taken with a Kinect in classical poses - video embedded below:

The renaissance sculptures were allegories of the world trough and for cultural or ethic knowledge. What would it be like nowadays ?

Renaissance Full Hd is a virtual museum, letting people be in the internet posterity throughout the web culture.
Contemporary sculptures in every room, presenting a web culture in witch we are all in.
New icon are built, allegories are renewed.

The Kinect Sensor allows to scan people, their bodies become polygons, their avatars become eternal.
MSN, Wikipedia, the Anonymous movement or the social networks, Renaissance Full HD makes the internet culture as a part of our common History.

Link

prostheticknowledge:

CV Dazzle Look No 5

Adam Harvey’s anti-facial recognition fashion project continues with this new look put together for an article for The New York Times Sunday Review:

Next year the Janus program, an initiative run by the director of national intelligence, will begin to collect photographs of people’s faces from social media websites and public video feeds. Machines will then use powerful algorithms to pair those photos with existing biometric profiles.

…. My project, CV Dazzle, explores how fashion can be used as camouflage from face-detection technology, the first step in automated face recognition. The name is derived from a type of World War I naval camouflage called Dazzle, which used cubist-inspired designs to break apart the visual continuity of a battleship and conceal its orientation and size. Likewise, CV Dazzle uses avant-garde hairstyling and makeup designs to break apart the continuity of a face.

The New York Times piece is probably the best visual explanation there is … you can read it here

Saturday, December 14, 2013

seluded:

Oritsunagumono: X-Ray Origami by Takayuki Hori

Takayuki Hori has created this stunning series entitled ‘Oritsunagumono’ (translated as ‘things folded and connected’) which is a collection of origami works designed to highlight the environmental threat of pollution to a number of species native to Japan’s coastal waterways.

Each translucent sheet is printed with fragments of an animal’s skeleton or pieces that could have been potentially ingested in these areas. They are then assembled, by the art of paper folding, into three-dimensional models. As you can see once the paper is folded upon itself it brings each of the fragments together, revealing the suffering of each animal in these polluted areas.

prostheticknowledge:

The Illustrated History of Projection Mapping

Fascinating page demonstrating the history of projection mapping as we understand it today from the 1960’s onwards - the examples in the gifs above are all before 2001:

While projection mapping has recently exploded into the conciousness of artists and advertisers everywhere, the history of projection mapping dates back longer than you may imagine.

If you try Googling for “Projection Mapping” you won’t find anything older than 3 years. That is because projection mapping’s older, academic name is “Spatial Augmented Reality” . The field is also known as “video mapping”, but projection mapping seems to be winning out in the United States.

One of the videos included is this interactive object / digital painting example from 2001:

The is so much more about the history of this type of visual technology, but it is a good place to start. Also highly recommended is watching the art installation ‘Displacements’ from 1980 (!!!) - impressive work.

The whole article can be found here

prostheticknowledge:

I PIXEL U

iOS7 photo app can pixelate subjects in photos, which gives the look of 8bit digital subjects in the real world.

It is a simple, so easy app!!! “Pixel in real world”

After opening the app, you simply choose between take a photo or pick a photo from gallery. After recognize the face automatically from photos, It shows up with the guidelines.

Features:

- Auto face detection from photos.
- Auto adjustment by types of your picture. No settings!
- Use real world backgrounds with pixelated person.
- Edit Mask to change the area you want to pixelate.
- 
Share your amazing PIXEL ARTS with all your friends.

More can be found at the J2WORK website here or the App Store here

hamsterloki:
knottybear:
archiemcphee:
Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:
[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 
So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

hamsterloki:

knottybear:

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

prostheticknowledge:

The Open Hand Project

A 3D printed robotic prosthetic hand which is a fraction of the cost compared to current available models - video embedded below:

The Open Hand Project aims to make advanced prosthetic hands more accessible to amputees. The Dextrus hand is the realization of this goal, it’s a low-cost robotic hand that offers much of the functionality of a human hand. Ultimately, these hands will be sold for under $1000 (£630).

The Open Hand Project is open-source, which means all of the plans to make a robotic hand will be published online with no patents, anyone has the right to make their own and even sell it themselves. You’re funding the full development of the hand with the Open Hand Project, after that companies will be able to use the designs and sell the hands all over the world. This really helps get these devices out to developing countries and places where import taxes might otherwise increase the cost of distribution.

The project is looking for funding through an indiegogo campaign - more info can be found here

odditiesoflife:

Stunning Time Capsule House Opened After 100 Years

An eccentric wealthy civil servant, Louis Mantin, wrote a will stating that his house was to be closed then reopened to the public a hundred years after his death, shedding light on how people lived back in the 19th century. This peek into life a century ago shows a world of opulence and change. Electricity and hot running water were new phenomena in houses, as were indoor toilets. The living areas were made for women who wore long skirts and sat sewing or at other gentle pursuits while men’s spaces were big and dark and bold.
Louis Mantin’s bedroom is a jewel of opulence with its carved four poster bed, but most extreme are the walls covered in gilded leather. This material was made in 1812 and covered in silver leaf, then varnished in yellow to give it a golden look.
The bed in the Ladies Salon was hung with curtains in the same pink material the walls are covered in. Called “Four Seasons”, Allaire’s room was extremely feminine, with painted ornamentation above every door showing seasonal scenes.
Wanting the best of everything, Mantin’s was the first house in Moulins to have electricity, and one of the only ones to have hot and cold running water as well as toilets on each floor.

The electric lamp shown here came from the catholic church. The assistant curator says: “Mantin wanted to have comfort—he was very interested in modernization.”

Mantin was interested in all sorts of eclectic things, and in his house you could find not only the stuffed wolf but also a diorama of real dead frogs fighting a duel in a glass globe. There is also a rat playing a violin and a stuffed blowfish.
The toilet is porcelain covered with wood, and the bath of course is a modern (for the time) version of the hip bath. The screen in front of the fire was intended to prevent drafts when people were soaking in the warm tub.
The formal living room is opulent in the extreme! It contains marble-topped tables, a chandelier, embroidered chairs, and rather than the usual mirror above the fire place, there is a window into the next room
Although the house is stunning, Mantin only partially set out what he intended to show. He did indeed conceal his home for 100 years to reveal the dramatic differences between houses of today and his house from a century ago. However since Mantin was rich and owned a mansion, he is only showing how rich people lived in opulence 100 years ago. This is certainly not how most people lived then.
astrodidact:
A team at the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics is developing an experiment intended to test a seemingly insane idea that the third dimension doesn’t actually exist but is in fact a hologram created by the intertwining of time and depth at the Planck length.
This idea while seemingly insane is supported by the math, but to date there is no physical evidence to confirm it. That in itself is not surprising because we don’t have the tools to observe it. Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab says “You can’t perceive it because nothing ever travels faster than light, this holographic view is how the universe would look if you sat on a photon.”
Enter the Holographic Interferometer or Holometer. The Holometer is a machine designed to test this very idea. It works by setting up two distinct but cooperative Interferometers. A Holometer works by sending a beam of light down a vacuum where it hits a beam splitter that, you guessed it, splits the beam in two. The two beams then travel in separate directions before hitting a mirror and being bounced back.
Since the beams of light travel at a constant speed, when they come back together they should be in sync. Any tiny vibration would change the frequency of the waves causing them to be out of sync when they meet back at the origin point.
If this happens it would indicate a fuzziness of space-time similar to the fuzziness of an image when you zoom in too far, essentially a pixelation of reality. Sensors on the outside of the instrument will detect any vibrations and cancel them out ensuring that any discrepancies are in fact due to pixelation or fuzziness of space-time.
If successful this will be the first physical evidence and measure of the Planck length and would support Hogan’s notion of the holographic nature of the universe.
Fermilab is planning to begin gathering data next year.
http://sciencethat.com/?p=182

astrodidact:

A team at the Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics is developing an experiment intended to test a seemingly insane idea that the third dimension doesn’t actually exist but is in fact a hologram created by the intertwining of time and depth at the Planck length.

This idea while seemingly insane is supported by the math, but to date there is no physical evidence to confirm it. That in itself is not surprising because we don’t have the tools to observe it. Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab says “You can’t perceive it because nothing ever travels faster than light, this holographic view is how the universe would look if you sat on a photon.”

Enter the Holographic Interferometer or Holometer. The Holometer is a machine designed to test this very idea. It works by setting up two distinct but cooperative Interferometers. A Holometer works by sending a beam of light down a vacuum where it hits a beam splitter that, you guessed it, splits the beam in two. The two beams then travel in separate directions before hitting a mirror and being bounced back.

Since the beams of light travel at a constant speed, when they come back together they should be in sync. Any tiny vibration would change the frequency of the waves causing them to be out of sync when they meet back at the origin point.

If this happens it would indicate a fuzziness of space-time similar to the fuzziness of an image when you zoom in too far, essentially a pixelation of reality. Sensors on the outside of the instrument will detect any vibrations and cancel them out ensuring that any discrepancies are in fact due to pixelation or fuzziness of space-time.

If successful this will be the first physical evidence and measure of the Planck length and would support Hogan’s notion of the holographic nature of the universe.

Fermilab is planning to begin gathering data next year.

http://sciencethat.com/?p=182

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Listen to Bitcoin Transactions in Real-time

Realtime Bitcoin transaction visualizer. See and hear new transactions, trades and blocks as they propagate.

Listen to Bitcoin is a realtime trade visualizer by Maximilian Laumeister, turning each transaction into a bubble and audible tone. 

 
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